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Don Neil and Annette Reynolds at Hadley's Orient Hotel
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Meet the philanthropists behind Australia’s richest prize for landscape art

Don Neil and Annette Reynolds, owners of Hadley's Orient Hotel, have launched a new art prize that they hope will create a legacy to benefit Australian artists and be another reason to visit Tasmania. The Hadley's Art Prize, Hobart will provide one of the world's richest prizes for landscape art with the winning entry receiving $100 000 and an exhibition of finalists work to be displayed at the iconic hotel after which the prize is named.
Aunty Lola Greeno, Jeanette James, Aunty Corrie Fullard, Aunty Dulcie Greeno, Bronwyn McAnally. luna tunapri workshop
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kanalaritja (kah nah lar ree tchah) – An Unbroken String

Shell stringing is a celebration of culture and a symbol of identity – an unbroken string that connects the Tasmanian Aboriginal Community, to Ancestors, culture and Country. kanalaritja (kah nah lar ree tchah) – An Unbroken String is a stunning exhibition at the Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery (TMAG) in Hobart. It features beautiful, delicate and rare shell necklaces created by Tasmanian Aboriginal makers including Lola Greeno, Dulcie Greeno, Corrie Fullard, Jeanette James, Rachell Quillerat and others including a work by 5 year old Eve Plank.
Tristan und Isolde
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Tasmanian Symphony Orchestra’s memorable performance of Tristan und Isolde

In a TSO first, proving that high-end cultural tourism is a very real phenomenon, interstate and international visitors comprised 55% of individual ticket buyers at the Orchestra’s concert performance of excerpts from Wagner’s Tristan und Isolde in Hobart last Saturday night, 19 November. In an extraordinary coup for the TSO, Swedish soprano Nina Stemme – who was described by the New York Times as “the world’s reigning Isolde” – and Australian tenor Stuart Skelton sang the title roles of Wagner’s Tristan und Isolde.
Luke McGregor and Celia Pacquola on the set of 'Rosehaven'
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Behind the scenes of Rosehaven

Rosehaven is a small (fictional) town in Tasmania, it is proper country, beyond the reach of tree changers. Daniel (Luke McGregor) is moving home to take over the family real-estate business while his domineering and frankly terrifying mother is incapacitated. Daniel’s best friend and perpetual teenager, Emma (Celia Pacquola), arrives at Daniel’s door, hiding out from a marriage that didn’t last the honeymoon.
The Better Son
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Katherine Johnson’s journey from prize to publication

Katherine Johnson's prize-winning manuscript has been released as a novel, The Better Son. Set in Mole Creek, the literary thriller was inspired by the true story of two young boys who discovered one of Tasmania’s most popular tourist caves in 1906 only to keep it secret for years.
Sara Maher at Dove Lake, Cradle Mountain - Lake St Clair National Park
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Wilderness strengthens creativity of Tasmanian artists

Tasmania, re-wilding their artists for the last 20 years. The modern world is a fast, technically driven and socially connected place. It is also a place where paleo diets and human re-wilding have become popular ways to reject modern living and plug into a simpler and natural way of being. In Tasmania they have been re-wilding their artists for the last 20 years by setting them free in a wilderness environment where they can disconnect from daily life and focus completely on making art.
When first I raised the tempest (detail)
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Chalk + spit = clouds

Leading British artist Tacita Dean has created a new blackboard drawing for the Tempest exhibition at the Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery (TMAG).
MONA - Museum of Old and New Art
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Is there more to Tassie than MONA?

Tasmania’s island location means that it has always been slightly outside of the mainstream and has beaten to the sound of its own drum. We love MONA completely, but thankfully there is also a lot more to see.